Euro 2021 venues: The 11 cities and stadiums hosting Euros fixtures

The craic will be non-existent now Dublin's lost hosting rights.

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11 cities dotted across the continent will host this summer’s European Championship – but it should have been 12! Yep, we’re still not over Dublin being stripped of four great games because of coronavirus restrictions.

UEFA bigwigs are desperate for fans to fill the stands – well, at least to 25 per cent capacity – but Irish officials couldn’t offer that guarantee so the matches were swept up by Russia and England.

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Sure, the other host cities are (probably) not as fun as Dublin but it still promises to be a top-quality summer of football – even though The Boys In Green failed to qualify.

We’ve detailed all the fixtures taking place at every stadium so you’re in the know. Paddy’s top traders have also rustled up a host of betting markets for the Euros and you can check them out by clicking HERE.

Netherlands – Amsterdam

Stadium: Johan Cruijff ArenA
Capacity: 55,500

The Netherlands have home advantage for all three of their Group C games before the runners-up in Groups A and B meet in a last-16 clash so Wales bosses could be busy booking plane tickets for Amsterdam if they’re second best in their pool.

Sunday 13 June
Group C: Netherlands vs Ukraine (20:00)
Thursday 17 June
Group C: Netherlands vs Austria (20:00)
Monday 21 June
Group C: North Macedonia vs Netherlands (17:00)
Saturday 26 June
R16: 2A vs 2B (17:00)

12/1
Netherlands Winner

Azerbaijan – Baku

Stadium: Baku Olympic Stadium
Capacity: 69,870

The host city for half of the Group A fixtures and the impressive ground – opened in 2015 – also gets in on the quarter-final action. Arsenal fans have probably etched it from their memories but the Baku Olympic Stadium was the venue for the 2019 Europa League final.

Saturday 12 June
Group A: Wales vs Switzerland (14:00)
Wednesday 16 June
Group A: Turkey vs Wales (17:00)
Sunday 20 June
Group A: Switzerland vs Turkey (17:00)
Saturday 3 July
QF3: Winner 3 vs Winner 1 (17:00)

Romania – Bucharest

Stadium: National Arena
Capacity: 55,634

The other half of Group C is based in Romania while there’s also a group winner vs lucky loser last-16 tie potentially featuring Wales in the bag for Bucharest.

Sunday 13 June
Group C: Austria vs North Macedonia (17:00)
Thursday 17 June
Group C: Ukraine vs North Macedonia (14:00)
Monday 21 June
Group C: Ukraine vs Austria (17:00)
Monday 28 June
R16: 1F vs 3A/B/C (20:00)

1/40
Austria Group to Qualify

Hungary – Budapest

Stadium: Puskas Arena
Capacity: 67,215

Named after the legendary Ferenc Puskas, this massive place is the venue for half of the Group of Death matches – and Hungary will need all the help they can get from the home crowd in their games against Portugal and France. England or Scotland could be in action here in the last 16 if they progress as one of the best third-place teams.

Tuesday 15 June
Group F: Hungary vs Portugal (17:00)
Saturday 19 June
Group F: Hungary vs France (14:00)
Wednesday 23 June
Group F: Portugal vs France (20:00)
Sunday 27 June
R16: 1C vs 3D/E/F (17:00)

Denmark – Copenhagen

Stadium: Parken Stadium
Capacity: 38,065

The Danes will be hoping home advantage helps them progress from Group B while England or Scotland will definitely be in action at Parken Stadium – the smallest of the venues – if they finish second in Group D.

Saturday 12 June
Group B: Denmark vs Finland (17:00)
Thursday 17 June
Group B: Denmark vs Belgium (17:00)
Monday 21 June
Group B: Russia vs Denmark (20:00)
Monday 28 June
R16: 2D vs 2E (17:00)

13/5
Denmark Reach the Quarter Finals

Scotland – Glasgow

Stadium: Hampden Park
Capacity: 51,866

It could be a big Tuesday night in Glasgow if the Tartan Army beat Croatia and punch their ticket to the Round of 16. Scotland have two fixtures on home turf but must also travel to Wembley for the Battle of Britain against England. A third-place finish in Group D could be enough for Steve Clarke’s men to play at home in the last 16 although a clash against Spain, Poland, Sweden or Slovakia would lie in wait.

Monday 14 June
Group D: Scotland vs Czech Republic (14:00)
Friday 18 June
Group D: Croatia vs Czech Republic (17:00)
Tuesday 22 June
Group D: Croatia vs Scotland (20:00)
Tuesday 29 June
R16: 1E vs 3A/B/C/D (20:00)

England – London

Stadium: Wembley Stadium
Capacity: 90,000

The Three Lions have home advantage for their three opening fixtures although a potentially nightmarish last-16 tie lies in wait for the winner of Group D. The tournament reaches it climax at Wembley so Harry Kane and co will be desperate to win the whole thing in front of their fans. It would be quite the summer in England if they go the distance.

Sunday 13 June
Group D: England vs Croatia (14:00)
Friday 18 June
Group D: England vs Scotland (20:00)
Tuesday 22 June
Group D: Czech Republic vs England (20:00)
Saturday 26 June
R16: 1A vs 2C (20:00)
Tuesday 29 June
R16: 1D vs 2F (17:00)
Tuesday 6 July
SF1: Winner QF2 vs Winner QF1 (20:00)
Wednesday 7 July
SF2: Winner QF4 vs Winner QF3 (20:00)
Sunday 11 July
Final: Winner SF1 vs Winner SF2 (20:00)

5/1
England Winner

Germany – Munich

Stadium: Allianz Arena
Capacity: 70,000

Despite being one of the most impressive stadiums in Europe, the home of Bayern Munich only hosts four matches. Germany are on their own turf for games against France, Portugal and Hungary so that could be key to escaping the Group of Death.

Tuesday 15 June
Group F: France vs Germany (20:00)
Saturday 19 June
Group F: Portugal vs Germany (17:00)
Wednesday 23 June
Group F: Germany vs Hungary (20:00)
Friday 02 July
QF: Match 4 vs Match 2 (20:00)

Italy – Rome

Stadium: Stadio Olimpico
Capacity: 72,698

The Azzurri kick off the action against Turkey on June 11 and boast home advantage for all of their Group A clashes. Depending on quite a few outcomes, England and Scotland could be in action in Rome’s quarter-final tie.

Friday 11 June
Group A: Turkey vs Italy (20:00)
Wednesday 16 June
Group A: Italy vs Switzerland (20:00)
Sunday 20 June
Group A: Italy vs Wales (17:00)
Saturday 3 July
QF4: Winner 8 vs Winner 7 (20:00)

6/1
Italy Winner

Russia – Saint Petersburg

Stadium: Krestovsky Stadium
Capacity: 67,800

The big winner of Dublin’s absence, the 2018 World Cup venue hosts SEVEN fixtures including a quarter-final tie which could feature England or Scotland. The Three Lions lost 2-0 to Belgium at this ground in the World Cup third-place play-off three years ago.

Saturday 12 June
Group B: Belgium vs Russia (20:00)
Monday 14 June
Group E: Poland vs Slovakia (17:00)
Wednesday 16 June
Group B: Finland vs Russia (14:00)
Friday 18 June
Group E: Sweden vs Slovakia (14:00)
Monday 21 June
Group B: Finland vs Belgium (20:00)
Wednesday 23 June
Group E: Sweden vs Poland (17:00)
Friday 2 July
QF1: Winner 6 vs Winner 5 (19:00)

Spain – Seville

Stadium: Estadio de La Cartuja
Capacity: 60,000

Spain’s sixth-largest arena was picked as a last-minute replacement for the San Mames Stadium in Bilbao for COVID-19 reasons. The Spanish public will expect three wins from three in Group E while they’ll also get a chance to watch a last-16 fixture which could feature England, Scotland or Wales if they progress as a lucky loser.

Monday 14 June
Group E: Spain vs Sweden (20:00)
Saturday 19 June
Group E: Spain vs Poland (20:00)
Wednesday 23 June
Group E: Slovakia vs Spain (17:00)
Sunday 27 June
R16: 1B vs 3A/D/E/F (20:00)

8/1
Spain Winner

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